Friday, December 24, 2010

FREE HAWAI'I

Free Hawai`i






HOW DID HAWAIIANS BECOME OUTCASTS IN THEIR OWN LAND?




Here's What The History Books Won't Tell You -


Western diseases, to which Hawaiians had no immunity, decimated their numbers. At the time of western contact, well over 500,000 people inhabited the Hawaiian Islands.






By 1805 that number had been more than halved.


By 1853 there were only 71,000 Hawaiian or part-Hawaiian people in the islands.




Within 100 years of western contact, the Hawaiian population had been reduced by nearly 90 percent.




According to the 2000 census, the numbers of people who claim some native Hawaiian ancestry have increased to over 400,000. But only 239,000 live in Hawai`i and they are the poorest, most locked-up population in the state.


Although they only make up about 20 percent of the state's population, in June 2001 they made up 39 percent of the state's prison population, according to the state Department of Public Safety.


Sadly, today they make up 37 percent of the state's homeless population.







Thursday, December 9, 2010

The History of the Hawaiian Lei


The History of the Hawaiian Lei

The lei custom was introduced to the Hawaiian Islands by early Polynesian voyagers, who took an incredible journey from Tahiti, navigating by the stars in sailing canoes. With these early settlers, the lei tradition in Hawaii was born.


Leis were constructed of flowers, leaves, shells, seeds, nuts, feathers, and even bone and teeth of various animals. In Hawaiian tradition, these garlands were worn by ancient Hawaiians to beautify themselves and distinguish themselves from others. The Maile lei was perhaps the most significant. Among other sacred uses, it was used to signify a peace agreement between opposing chiefs. In a Heiau (temple), the chiefs would symbolically intertwine the green Maile vine, and its completion officially established peace between the two groups.



A Custom of Aloha

With the advent of tourism in the islands, the lei quickly became the symbol of Hawaii to millions of visitors worldwide.


During the "Boat Days" of the early 1900s, lei vendors lined the pier at Aloha Tower to welcome malihini (visitors) to the islands and kama'aina (locals) back home. It is said that departing visitors would throw their lei into the sea as the ship passed Diamond Head, in the hopes that, like the lei, they too would return to the islands again someday.

Today, visitors can easily bring back the nostalgia of old Hawaii by ordering a traditional flower lei greeting for their arrival at the airport. Greeters welcome visitors with a warm “aloha” and adorn them with beautiful fresh leis. It's a wonderful way to begin a Hawaiian vacation.

Lei Etiquette

There are very few "rules" when it comes to wearing a Hawaiian lei. Anyone can wear one, anytime - there need not be an occasion. It is perfectly fine for one to purchase or make a lei for themselves. It is common for locals to have a nut, seed or shell lei on hand to wear on special occasions. And hats are often adorned with flower, fern or feather leis.



There are, however, a couple of "unspoken rules" one should know when receiving a lei for the first time. A lei should be a welcomed celebration of one person's affection to another. Therefore, always accept a lei, never refuse. The proper way to wear a lei is gently draped over the shoulders, hanging down both in front and in back. It is considered rude to remove a lei from your neck in the presence of the person who gave it to you, so if you must, be discreet.




Lei giving is a regular part of any special occasion such as birthdays, anniversaries, weddings, and graduations. It is not uncommon for a graduating senior to have so many leis around their neck that they can no longer see!



Lei or Leis?

The Hawaiian language does not distinguish between singular and plural. Therefore, the proper way to say the plural form of lei is actually just “lei.” However, on our website we have chosen to use the anglicized version of this word to prevent confusion.

Wednesday, December 8, 2010

The True Story Of Rudolph The Red-Nosed Reindeer








THE TRUE STORY OF RUDOLPH THE RED-NOSED REINDEER



A guy named Bob May, depressed and brokenhearted, stared out his drafty apartment window into the chilling December night. His 4-year-old daughter Barbara sat on his lap quietly sobbing.


Bobs wife, Evelyn, was dying of cancer. Little Barbara couldn't understand why her mommy could never come home. Barbara looked up into her dads eyes and asked, "Why isn't Mommy just like everybody else's Mommy?"


Bob's jaw tightened and his eyes welled with tears. Her question brought waves of grief, but also of anger. It had been the story of Bob's life. Life always had to be different for Bob. Small when he was a kid, Bob was often bullied by other boys. He was too little at the time to compete in sports. He was often called names he'd rather not remember . From childhood, Bob was different and never seemed to fit in.


Bob did complete college, married his loving wife and was grateful to get his job as a copywriter at Montgomery Ward during the Great Depression.


Then he was blessed with his little girl. But it was all short-lived. Evelyn's bout with cancer stripped them of all their savings and now Bob and his daughter were forced to live in a two-room apartment in the Chicago slums.


Evelyn died just days before Christmas in 1938. Bob struggled to give hope to his child, for whom he couldn't even afford to buy a Christmas gift. But if he couldn't buy a gift, he was determined a make one - a storybook! Bob had created an animal character in his own mind and told the animals story to little Barbara to give her comfort and hope.


Again and again Bob told the story, embellishing it more with each telling. Who was the character? What was the story all about? The story Bob May created was his own autobiography in fable form. The character he created was a misfit outcast like he was. The name of the character? A little reindeer named Rudolph, with a big shiny nose.


Bob finished the book just in time to give it to his little girl on Christmas Day. But the story doesn't end there. The general manager of Montgomery Ward caught wind of the little storybook and offered Bob May a nominal fee to purchase the rights to print the book. Wards went on to print, Rudolph the Red-Nosed Reindeer and distribute it to children visiting Santa Claus in their stores. By 1946 Wards had printed and distributed more than six million copies of Rudolph. That same year, a major publisher wanted to purchase the rights from Wards to print an updated version of the book. In an unprecedented gesture of kindness, the CEO of Wards returned all rights back to Bob May. The book became a best seller. Many toy and marketing deals followed and Bob May, now remarried with a growing family, became wealthy from the story he created to comfort his grieving daughter.


But the story doesn't end there either. Bob's brother-in-law, Johnny Marks, made a song adaptation to Rudolph. Though the song was turned down by such popular vocalists as Bing Crosby and Dinah Shore , it was recorded by the singing cowboy, Gene Autry. "Rudolph the Red-Nosed Reindeer" was released in 1949 and became a phenomenal success, selling more records than any other Christmas song, with the exception of "White Christmas." The gift of love that Bob May create d for his daughter so long ago kept on returning back to bless him again and again. And Bob May learned the lesson, just like his dear friend Rudolph, that being different isn't so bad. In fact, being different can be a blessing.


The creator of "Rudolph, the Red-Nosed Reindeer" passed away at the age of 71 in 1976.


Rudolph himself turns 72 in January 2011

Kim Taylor Reece...Hawaii Artist






Kim Taylor Reece, Hawaii’s foremost fine art photographer, has been studying hula kahiko for nearly 25 years. A catalyst of Hawaii’s Cultural Renaissance, his photography captures the mystery and magic of this dance, which for generations has excited the imaginations of people around the world.






In his research, Kim has traveled with the Hawaii State Foundation of Culture and the Arts, enabling him to study and work with dancers from more than 37 different Pacific Islands. His extensive research of costumes and dances of the early Hawaiians captures the spirit and essence of this ancient ritual.






His unique style has established the visual standards for hula kahiko. As millions encounter Kim’s work everyday, it helps to preserve the hula and enrich lives with his fine art photography.






Kim’s award winning photography has brought him worldwide recognition. Over the years, Kim has received 15 Pele Awards (communication and arts), Print Magazine Awards, Kahili Awards (HVCB), Travel Journalism Awards and National Community Service Awards. His images have been acquired by collectors, dignitaries, and museums internationally.






He studied art at Long Beach State in California and because he is color-blind was told to "change majors or be a starving artist". He uses it to his advantage in capturing the subtleties of the kahiko in black and white. He uses sepia tone to represent the timelessness of the dance. Kim has been publishing his art prints since 1983.






Kim has a gallery at Sacred Falls, Oahu, Hawaii. "The beauty in nature of the lush green valley and the striking blue ocean exemplifies what I am trying to portray through my work." Says the artist of his remote location.






For those who appreciate hula, Kim Taylor Reece has devoted his talents to the celebration of Hawaii’s ancient dance.



















Sunday, December 5, 2010

NINE WORDS WOMEN USE




NINE WORDS WOMEN USE





1.) Fine - This is the word women use to end an Argument when they are right and you need to shut up




2.) Five Minutes - If she is getting dressed, this means a half and hour. Five Minutes is only five minutes if you have just been given 25 more minutes to watch the game




3.) Nothing - This is the calm before the storm. This means something and you should be on your toes. Arguments that begin with nothing usually end in Fine






4.) Go Ahead - This is a dare, not permission. Don't Do It!!!






5.) Loud Sigh - This is actually a word, but is a non-verbal statement often misunderstood by men. A Loud Sigh means she thinks you are an Idiot and Wonders why she is wasting her time standing here and arguing with you about nothing. (Refer back to #3 for the meaning of Nothing.)




6.) That's Okay - This is one of the most dangerous statements a woman can make to a man. That's Okay means she wants to think long and hard before deciding how and when you will pay for your mastake.






7.) Thanks - A woman is thanking you, do not question, or faint. Just say you're welcome. (I want to add in a clause here - This is true, unlless she says "Thanks a lot" - that is pure sarcasm and she is not thanking you at all. DO NOT say "you're welcome". That will only bring "Whatever").






8.) Whatever - Is a woman's way of saying F--- YOU!!!






9.) Don't Worry About it, I got it - Another dangerous statement, meaning this is something that a woman has told a man to do several times, but is now doing it herself. This will later result in a man asking "What's Wrong?" For the woman's response Refer to # 3.






Saturday, December 4, 2010

The Power Of Prayer



Does prayer’s power heal the sick, change lives, or fulfill our needs and desires? Should you bury a statue of Saint Joseph, if you want to sell your home, or put Saint Christopher on your dashboard as you travel this holiday season? There’s no definitive way to prove the power of prayer, but it’s not for lack of trying. Humans, including scientists, charlatans, and medical experts, have attempted to prove and disprove the efficacy of prayer since the beginning of intellectual curiosity.







The most surprising thing about these studies is that we’ve learned nothing. Some studies seem to show concentrated group prayer, whatever that is, has a measurable effect on AIDS patients. A decade ago, Dr. Elisabeth Targ’s famous double-blind research convinced some that AIDS patients who were prayed for lived longer than AIDS patients who were not prayed for by a controlled group of prayer-sayers. How do you control that?






Reading university studies is interesting, but confusing. Some show cardiac patients who believe in God do better than those who don’t. On the other hand, in a Harvard study, it looks like cardiac patients assured of receiving prayers of intercession didn’t fare as well as others, and Francis Galton, cousin of Charles Darwin, determined that if a king’s subjects prayed for him, the poor guy lived a shorter life than other kings.






Consider this: Studies aside, nearly everyone has stories of friends, family, and acquaintances that lived a miracle brought about by prayer or devotion. A widow accidentally drops her keepsake wedding ring in the ocean. She prays daily that she will find it. Years later, it turns up in the local fisherman’s catch. A missing child is inexplicably recovered when his whole community gathers to pray.






My husband was diagnosed with a terminal illness ten years ago. We prepared ourselves. We prayed a lot. He’s still around, and his medical team is astounded. He should not have had a positive outcome. There are thousands of stories of humans visited by angels – some of them seem inarguable. We can’t get enough of George’s angel in It’s a Wonderful Life, and books about causing change through prayer fill the bookstores’ shelves.






You can drive yourself to distraction Googling for answers on whether prayer has power or can effect change. The Online Surgical Technicians Course has a comprehensive list of formal, rigorous, scientific studies. You can find first-hand prayer testimonials on the Experience Project Web site and, I dare say, all over the Web.






Maybe the most rational conclusion was drawn by Wendy Cadge from the sociology department of Brandeis University, Massachusetts. An expert on how religion and medicine impact each other in today’s American culture, Cage remarked, “With double-blind clinical trials, scientists tried their best to study something that may be beyond their best tools; and [this] reflects more about them and their assumptions than about whether prayer works.”






The question isn’t complicated. The answer doesn’t lie in studies funded by millions of tax dollars. If you attend to your spiritual growth, you will have a relationship with your personal mode of prayer and with your higher power. When your devotion is honest and sincere – prayer can smooth out rough areas and improve the quality of your life.

Believe in miracles.






Sunday, November 28, 2010

GOOD HAWAIIAN SHAVE ICE.....




Alot of people ask what good shave ice stores are there around Hawaii, and so we decided to create a list of some shave ice stores that we can think of off top of our head. Since there are so many stores, there may be some that we have forgotten. Please, if you know a good shave ice store or if your store is not listed, tell us and we would be more than glad to add it onto the list!







Oahu


Matsumoto Shave Ice - The King and World renown, need we say more?


Aoki's Shave Ice - A great alternative for Matsumotos. Shave ice is packed by hand and spoon. Also one of my favorite places and a beautiful old building.


Island Sno- Great place to eat shave ice if you are swimming in Kailua


Shimazu Shave Ice- Known for its fine texture and large size. Very traditional hand packed style shave ice.


Waiolas - Known for their melt in your mouth texture and one of the most popular shave ice stores. Very similar to Hula Girls Shave Ice's style!


Hyatt Regency- Good for those on waikiki beach


Diamon Head Concession- For alamoana beach


Onolicious Dog - At Hilton Hotel


Island Freeze- International market place


Paradise Burgers and Grill - Right inside Diamond Head crater. Perfect for those planning to hike the trail.


Ewa Seed - In Ewa Beach


Kokonuts- Where Obama got his shave ice at.


Tropicana- On waialae ave. Has alot of asian toppings.


Ice Garden - Asian style shave ice


Baldwins Shave Ice - A favorite for those living in the Waimalu area.


Tropical Rush - In north shore. Also sells surf boards and other swim wear.


Sea Country General Store- Serves shave ice in Waianae.


Dave's Ice Cream- Serves shave ice at stores in Waimanalo, Kapahulu, and around town.


Hale Koa- For those military personnel staying at the hotel.


Sheraton - There is a shave ice there somewhere, you can ask if you stay there.


Coconut Cafe- Right on Kuhio ave.


Shigalicious- On kinau st.


Moilili general store- Right on South King St. across from Zippys.


Kam Swap Meet- Right at the entrance


Kay's CrackSeed- At Manoa Shopping Center


Hanaki Restaurant-For those wishing to have shave ice with a japanese buffet.


Pineapple Coconut Hut- In Ala Moana Shopping Center


Koolina Beach Resort - Great shave ice is served in the snack bar area


Honolulu Adventure Park - Hawaii's only water park, with shave ice and cotton candy!


Beard Papa's- Perhaps some shave ice with your cream puff?


Aloha Stadium - Shave ice with swap meet






Big Island


Scandinavian Shave Ice - One of the most popular shave ice destinations on the Big Island. Located on Alii Dr


Hawaiian Ice Cones- Small friendly shave ice store located in Kailua Kona. Across from Kona Shopping Center.


Wilsons By the Bay - Popular shave ice store in Hilo


Kohaha Coffee Mill - In Hawi


Kawate Seed Store - In Hilo


Anue Nue Ice Cream - In Kawaihae Shopping Center


Beach Dog Internet Cafe






Maui


Tom's Mini Mart - Very friendly shave ice store in Wailuku


Local Boys Maui - Serves a variety of flavors in Kihei


Marriot - For customers who live in the Hotel


Aloha Island Shave Ice - In Hana


Westin Kanapali Resort - In the resort!


HomeMaid Bakery - with baked goods too!






Kauai


Hawaiian Blizzard Shave Ice - Great shave ice in Kapa'a outside the Big Save market, home of the $7 all u can eat Shave Ice! Say hi to Aron for us!


JoJo's Shave Ice - great story but be sure to go to the original in the alley


Koloa Shave Ice


Wishing Well- Hanalei, "Every shave ice is made custom for you. So please relax - enjoy and aloha!" reads their sign so chill out and wait! or she'll shout you a "Try wait, ya!"



Saturday, November 27, 2010

Kim Taylor Reece...Hawaii's Artist





 


Kim Taylor Reece, Hawaii’s foremost fine art photographer, has been studying hula kahiko for nearly 25 years. A catalyst of Hawaii’s Cultural Renaissance, his photography captures the mystery and magic of this dance, which for generations has excited the imaginations of people around the world.






In his research, Kim has traveled with the Hawaii State Foundation of Culture and the Arts, enabling him to study and work with dancers from more than 37 different Pacific Islands. His extensive research of costumes and dances of the early Hawaiians captures the spirit and essence of this ancient ritual.






His unique style has established the visual standards for hula kahiko. As millions encounter Kim’s work everyday, it helps to preserve the hula and enrich lives with his fine art photography.






Kim’s award winning photography has brought him worldwide recognition. Over the years, Kim has received 15 Pele Awards (communication and arts), Print Magazine Awards, Kahili Awards (HVCB), Travel Journalism Awards and National Community Service Awards. His images have been acquired by collectors, dignitaries, and museums internationally.






He studied art at Long Beach State in California and because he is color-blind was told to "change majors or be a starving artist". He uses it to his advantage in capturing the subtleties of the kahiko in black and white. He uses sepia tone to represent the timelessness of the dance. Kim has been publishing his art prints since 1983.






Kim has a gallery at Sacred Falls, Oahu, Hawaii. "The beauty in nature of the lush green valley and the striking blue ocean exemplifies what I am trying to portray through my work." Says the artist of his remote location.






For those who appreciate hula, Kim Taylor Reece has devoted his talents to the celebration of Hawaii’s ancient dance.


Hula Kahiko


















Plant A Seed For Prosperity




 Plant a Seed for Prosperity

With the New Year just around the corner, now is the time to begin thinking about what you want to manifest in the coming year… Or why wait? Plant that seed now to stimulate growth! Rather than simply “thinking” about what you want to nurture, this exercise will physically put your goals into motion when you “plant a seed for prosperity.”


What seed of an idea would you like to plant and grow into an opportunity? Financial abundance? Protection? It could be a skill or personal quality you’d like to acquire, or new adventure or creation. You probably already have a goal in mind, but just need to know what direction to put that energy in. For those that are still struggling with what they want to focus on, sit in meditation, or open your intuition and listen for divine messages that will help shape your goals or resolutions. When you have determined what it is that you are going to nurture in the coming year, write it down on a piece of paper.


From the list at the end of this article, locate the appropriate type of tree/seed based upon the corresponding energy that you are wanting to manifest. (You may want to also look up additional horticulture tips for the requirements of the different species, including climate and timing for planting to ensure a successful sprouting.)


When you’re ready to plant the seed, pick up the plant seed and concentrate on it, infusing it with your desires. If planting in a pot, first place your written desire at the bottom of the pot, or if planting outside, at the bottom of a hole that you have dug. Next, cover with a little soil, and proceed with planting your seed. Your written desire will feed the roots of the tree as it grows. Visit the sprouting tree frequently, water it, and emotionally feed it as well, knowing that as it grows, so will your desire.


Here are some appropriate trees to use:






Oak – Solid and strong, the Oak is the tree of endurance and triumph. When meditating or grounding, it is often the Oak tree that we visualize and embody because of its tremendous root system and its ability to anchor our souls.






Birch – As the Birch tree is the earliest tree to produce new leaves each year, it is known as a symbol of fertility and new beginnings. Birch brings luck in new endeavors, and aids in accomplishing goals. Bundles of birch twigs were bound together for use in witches’ brooms, and to ward off negative spirits.






Apple – The Apple tree is one of the most sacred trees, holding the energy of eternal youth and happiness in the afterlife. Cutting down an Apple tree was considered so unlucky in Ireland that they would call for a sacrifice of a person as payment for such wrongdoing.






Alder – Alder is associated with rebirth (resurrection), as the petals on the Alder tree reflect the spiral pattern of creation. Use Alder for situations concerning death or birth.






Rowan – The tree of fire, Rowan represents inspiration and vitality. Leaves of Rowan may be used to increase psychic powers, while the branches of the Rowan tree are often used for fabricating wands. If you had a magickal wand, made from the Rowan tree, what would you want to manifest?






Willow – The Willow embodies similar energy to that of the Moon. It provides protection from nightmares, harm, and betrayal.






Hawthorne – The tree associated with purification and chastity, this tree is used to bring forth a lighter energy, that of the fairy. It is no wonder that the Hawthorne tree is sacred to fairies, and cutting one down brings misfortune.






Holly – Holly is associated with luck and protection. Holly leaves are sometimes used for divination, as the number of berries indicates the severity of the coming winter.






Maple – With a sweetness like syrup, the Maple attracts love, money, and luck. It is often used for treasure chests and jewelry boxes holding your most precious items. Maple will offer the sweet allure to attract what you want.






Ash – The Ash tree is an ancient tree, associated with the Norse, and sacred to Poseidon, God of the Sea. Placing ash leaves under your pillow will aid in prophetic dreams






Hazel – Hazel is the tree that blooms with wisdom. Hazel nuts are strung and used for happiness within the home. Forked Hazel branches are often used as dowsing rods to aid in divination and locating water or hidden objects.






Elder – The Elder tree is associated with magick and manifestation. If hung over doorways, it repels negative spirits and energies, but if burned, it calls forth and invites negative spirits.






Friday, November 26, 2010

Hawaii is in Mourning

Hawaiian radio legend Krash Kealoha dies

 The Hawaiian music world is in mourning this Thanksgiving.






The father of modern Hawaiian radio Krash Kealoha passed away Thursday morning in his Waimanalo home.


Kealoha was suffering from a tumor and decided to forgo radiation treatment. According to Kealoha's wife, Chris, he was in poor condition.


Kealoha was the program director for KCCN FM 100, produced both radio and television shows, managed local musical groups and started the Na Hoku Hanohano awards.


Hawaiian music was always on Kealoha's mind. Friends in the Hawaiian music community say he was an integral part of pushing the music forward.


"He became the leader and program director of a unique group of people that would continue 30, 40 years to shape Hawaiian music. He took care of that and gave it forward to a younger generation of not only radio people, but entertainers," Hawaiian 105 KINE radio personality and entertainer Billy V said. "




Kealoha was also known for his spirit of aloha.






"Krash had a way of expressing himself like very few people. He knew that aloha was first. He had the sense of aloha when he spoke, whether to you, or me, or visitors who were coming here," Billy V said. "He had that sense of aloha in everything he did and he wasn't ready to leave yet. There was more that he wanted to do."


Kealoha also appeared in several TV shows including Magnum, P.I., Hawaii Five-O and The Jeffersons.
Kealoha's real name was Victor Opiopio.
RIP.....braddah Krash








The Aloha Tradition





The Aloha Tradition







While a few ancient Hawaiian customs have faded from memory, the tradition of lei-giving has managed to subsist and flourish. In the beautiful islands of Hawaii, everyone wears leis. A lei is a common symbol of love, friendship, celebration, honor, or greeting. In other words, it is a symbol of Aloha. Take a walk around Hawaii; you’ll find leis everywhere—graduations, parties, dances, weddings, and yes, even at the office. In Hawaii, any occasion can be considered special and “lei-worthy.” No one can resist the vibrant colors, the intoxicating fragrances, or the beautiful tradition of Hawaii’s most recognized icon…the flower lei.


The History of the Lei


The custom of the flower lei was introduced to Hawaii from the various surrounding Polynesian islands and even Asia. In ancient Hawaii, wearing a lei represented wealth, royalty, and rank. Leis were also heavily associated with hula, religion and geography.






Most Hawaiians preferred the Maile lei--a leafy vine that has fragrant spicy-sweet leaves that is draped and worn open-ended to the waist. However, royalty and Hawaiian chieftains favored the fiery, vibrant Ilima—a thin orange blossom that requires hundreds of flowers to make a single lei strand. Hawaiian Princess Kaiulani’s favorite lei was the Pikake—named after the peacocks in her garden—for the heavenly white blossoms and sweet jasmine fragrance.






The state of Hawaii is consists of eight major islands. Each island has its own designated lei which represents a harmonious marriage of texture and color. Most of these leis are unavailable for shipping to the mainland due to strict agricultural laws.






Hawaii – Lehua


Oahu – Ilima


Maui – Lokelani


Kauai – Mokihana


Molokai – Kukui


Lanai – Kaunaoa


Niihau – Pupu


Kaho’olawe – Hinahina


Before the familiar hum of airline jets were heard in the sky, tourist and travelers arrived in Hawaii by boat. Many old Hawaiians retell their stories of “boat days” with fond memories. When the boat would arrive at the dock, it was a social celebration with lei greeters, hula dancers, music, and photographers. A common custom for departing travelers was to toss their leis into the ocean by Diamond Head Crater. A safe return to Hawaii was ensured if their lei drifted to shore.






Since May 1, 1928, Hawaii has celebrated every May first as it’s official “Lei Day.” Hawaiians call it “May Day.” The flower lei is celebrated passionately on May Day with Hula, parades, and music. On May Day, most parents request to take a day off of work so they can watch their children participate in May Day festivities and programs at school. Everyone in Hawaii is encouraged to wear a lei on May Day.






Lei Etiquette


Leis can be worn, received, or given for almost any occasion. In Hawaii, a lei is given for an office promotion, a birthday, an anniversary, a graduation, or any special event. Yet more notably, a lei can be worn for no other reason than to enjoy the fragrance, take pleasure in the beautiful flowers, or simply, to celebrate the “Aloha Spirit.”






There is one big faux pas that should never be made. Never refuse a lei! Always graciously accept the lei with a toothy smile and a kiss on the cheek. (If you don’t feel comfortable with giving or receiving a kiss on the cheek, a warm hug is acceptable!) If you are allergic or sensitive to flowers, then discreetly and apologetically slip-off the lei. It is acceptable and considered a kind gesture to offer the lei to your spouse if you are unable to wear it.






Last, but not least, there is one more taboo…it is considered (in Hawaii) impolite to give a closed (tied) lei to a pregnant woman. Many Hawaiians feel that a closed lei around the neck is bad luck for the unborn child. (Head Hakus and open-ended leis are acceptable to give to pregnant woman.)




























Thursday, November 18, 2010

You Know You From Hawaii WEN.....




For all you local guys and gurls out dea......You know  you from Hawaii when...






- You can understand and speak pidgin english and da people from da mainland cannot understand you!






- No body is completely sure where "north" is...




- You eat rice every single day




- Its shave ice not snow cones, shoyu not soy sauce, saimin not ramen, slippers not flip flops




- The name Duke means royalty...




- You know what "ukus" are and you had um at least once when you was one lil keiki




- Da term "dress up" means one nice aloha shirt and jeans




- You know what "tutu" means




- You get a million pairs of rubbah slippahs outside your house when your family gets together




- You eat portuguese sausage, eggs and rice for breakfast




- You buy large quantities of toilet paper in case ders a longshoreman strike




- You would serve spam as a meat for dinner




- You know wut da "stink eye" is and how to give it




- You can correctly pronounce Kalanianaole, Kalakaua and Aiea




- You know wut a "Huli Huli" chicken is




- You know da difference between being hapa and hapai




- You know wut it takes to get into Kamehameha schools




- You tink 70 degrees is cold




- Public transportation = Da Bus




- You spent half your life barefoot




- You eat mango wit shoyu, vinegar and pepper




- You know how for cook rice by measuring da water wit da knuckle of your index finger




- You call everyone older den you "Aunty" or "Uncle" even if dey arent related to you




- The idea of taking something from a heiau is unthinkable




- A approaching hurricane only means one thing....Surfs up brah!




- Beans are da perfect condiment for ice cream






ALL PAU!

Wednesday, November 17, 2010

BETRAYED??



BETRAYED ???


For those who have been betrayed by husband, wife, fiance, fiancee, lover and friend.....welcome on board, love is not lost, its been misplaced until you find the right one......the pain passes but the beauty remains....there is the reason WHY..


FORGET THEM!! Forget their name,forget their face, forget their kiss, their warm embrace.


Forget the love that you once knew, remember they have someone new.
Forget them when they played your song, remember when you cried all night long.


Forget how close you once were, remember they have chosen him or her.
Forget how you memorized their walk, forget the way they used to talk. Forget the things they used to say, remember they have gone away.


Forget their laugh, forget their grin, forget the dimples on their chin. Forget the way they held you tight, remember they're not with you tonight. Forget the time that went so fast, forget the love that moved, its past. Forget they'd said they'd leave you never, remember they're gone forever.






Nani.......